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AMDA's 2015 Annual Conference


A36 - Adverse Events, Triggers, and Diagnostic Errors: Practical Aspects of Patient Safety and Risk Reduction for the Interdisciplinary Team - CME/CMD credits not available for this session


Mar 19, 2015 8:00am ‐ Mar 19, 2015 11:30am


Credits: None available.

Standard: $24.00

Description

Accreditation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine designates this Internet Enduring Material for a maximum of 3.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ABPLM Designation Statement: ThisInternet Enduring Material has been pre-approved by the American Board of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (ABPLM) for a total of 3.5 management hours toward certification as a Certified Medical Director (CMD) in post-acute and long-term care medicine. The CMD program is administered by the ABPLM.  Each physician should claim only those hours of credit actually spent on the activity.

Session Description:
This session will identify key components of an effective patient safety program in long-term and post-acute care, both generally and specifically for medical directors and the interdisciplinary team. It will discuss the use of trigger tools and cover numerous examples of triggers in three key areas: medications, care related issues, and infections. Discussion of actual cases will be used to illustrate how diagnostic errors are a major contributor to risk and adverse events. Many case examples will be used to explain the connections between concepts such as risk factors, precipitating factors, adverse events and adverse consequences, risk reduction, and mitigation of adverse consequences. Participants will have the opportunity to take actual clinical situations, identify related risks and precipitating events, and develop trigger tools and simple solutions that they can implement in their facilities. Actual cases and demonstration of the use of specific tools will help illustrate how patient safety can be built in to everyday practice and processes, including existing quality assurance and performance improvement activities.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Analyze an organization and facility in depth to identify important safety issues and their causes
  • Use a core set of tools and key clinical and management principles to evaluate and address patient safety issues
  • Implement a sustainable patient safety component of a facility’s quality assurance and performance improvement program
  • Identify in detail how to identify and prevent diagnostic errors that are a major source of risk factors and adverse consequences

Speaker(s):
Steven Levenson, MD, CMD
Julie Britton, MSN, GCNS-BC, RN

Disclosure(s):
None

Reference(s):
Levenson SA. Bridge building, not rain dancing: A medical director's core management responsibilities. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2001; 2: 125-133. Levenson SA. The Maryland regulations: Rethinking physician and medical director accountability in nursing homes. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2002; 3: 79-94. Levenson SA. The impact of laws and regulations in improving physician performance and care processes in long-term care. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2004; 5: 268-277. Levenson SA, Morley JE. Evidence rocks in long-term care, but does it roll? J Am Med Dir Assoc 2007, 8: 493-501. Levenson SA. The basis for improving and reforming long-term care, Part 1: The foundation. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2009; 10: 459–465. Levenson SA. The basis for improving and reforming long-term care, Part 2: Clinical problem solving and Abstract Submission http://www.prolibraries.com/library/abstract/pages/print.php?ajax=1&w... 2 of 5 9/6/2014 12:49 PM evidence-based care. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2009; 10: 520–529. Levenson SA. The basis for improving and reforming long-term care. Part 3: Essential elements for quality care. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2009; 10: 597–606. Levenson SA. Paper geriatrics (editorial). J l Amer Geriatr Soc 2010; 58: 1184-1186. Levenson SA. Medical Direction in Long-Term Care. (1993). Durham NC: Carolina Academic Press. Levenson SA. Bridge building, not rain dancing: A medical directors core management responsibilities. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2001; 2:125-133. Levenson SA. The Maryland regulations: Rethinking physician and medical director accountability in nursing homes. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2002; 3: 79-94. Levenson SA. The impact of laws and regulations in improving physician performance and care processes in long-term care. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2004; 5: 268-277. Levenson SA, Morley J E. Evidence rocks in long-term care, but does it roll? J Am Med Dir Assoc 2007, 8: 493-501. Levenson SA. The basis for improving and reforming long-term care, Part 1: The foundation. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2009; 10: 459–465. Levenson SA. The basis for improving and reforming long-term care, Part 2: Clinical problem solving and evidence-based care. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2009; 10: 520–529. Levenson SA. The basis for improving and reforming long-term care. Part 3: Essential elements for quality care. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2009; 10: 597–606. Levenson SA. Paper geriatrics (editorial). J l Amer Geriatr Soc 2010; 58: 1184-1186.
 

Speaker(s):

Credits

Credits: None available.

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