AMDA's 2015 Annual Conference

Mar 19, 2015 ‐ Mar 22, 2015


The information provided in this CME activity is for continuing education purposes only and is not meant to substitute for the independent medical/clinical judgment of a healthcare provider relative to diagnostic and treatment options of a specific patient’s medical condition.

Contact Information: For questions about this CME activity contact AMDA’s Education Department at 410-740-9743 or at education@amda.com

Instructions for Course Participation

  • Click on the session title to review the materials on Terms of Use and Disclaimer statements, accreditation information, target audience, learning objectives, and disclosure information
  • Complete the entire self-study activity (viewing the PowerPoint presentation and listen to the audio recording in its entirety)
  • Complete and submit the evaluation/post-test and CME claim form. You must earn a minimum 80% correct answers to claim credit. You may repeat the post-test until you receive the passing score at no additional fee.
  • Print out CME certificate
  • The online library awards credits for sessions ranging from 1 to 3.5 hours. Each activity should take you approximately the number of hours to complete as credits which are awarded for that activity, (e.g. for 1.5 credit hours awarded, the completion of the activity should take approximately 1.5 hours to complete.)

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Sponsored by AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine

Release Date: 06/2015    Valid Through: 06/30/2018

Click here for a list of Management and Clinical credit designations.

Accreditation
AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Designation
AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 102.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

AMDA Certification Program (AMDCP) Credit Designation
This enduring material has been pre-approved by the American Board for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (ABPLM) for a total of 92.5 credit hours toward certification/recertification as a Certified Medical Director in Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (CMD). 59 hours have been designated as Management education and 33.5  hours have been designated as Clinical education. The CMD program is administered by the ABPLM. Each physician should claim only those hours of credit actually spent on the activity.

ACCME STANDARDS FOR COMMERCIAL SUPPORT
As an ACCME accredited provider of CME, AMDA adheres to all elements of the ACCME Standards for Commercial Support. Individuals in a position to control the content of this education activity were required to disclose all relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest to AMDA. Disclosures were reviewed by the AMDA Education Department to identify any conflicts of interest and methods of conflict resolution were conducted for each of the identified conflicts. Individual presenter’s disclosures can be found within the CME information for each session.
 
PROGRAM PLANNING

AMDA wishes to gratefully acknowledge the Program Planning Committee for their dedication to AMDA education and the 2015 Annual Conference.


Suzanne Gillespie, MD (2015 Program Chair)
Thomas Edmondson, MD, CMD (Vice Chair)
Patricia Bach, PsyD, RN
Seki Balogun, MD, CMD
Michele F. Bellantoni, MD, CMD
Erin Brooks, RPA-C
Amy M. Corcoran, MD, CMD
Suzanne C. Cryst, RD, CSG, LD
Mary P. Evans, MD, CMD
Elizabeth Galik, PhD, CRNP
Julie Gammack, MD, CMD
George Grossberg, MD
Melinda Henderson, MD, CMD
Betty B. Lim, MD
Meenakshi Patel, MD, CMD
Verna Reynolds Sellers, MD, MPH, CMD
Philip Sloane, MD, MPH
George C. Wang, MD, PhD
Rollin M. Wright, MD, CMD
Robert Zorowitz, MD, MBA, CMD
 
Program Committee members with relevant financial relationships are listed below. All other Planning Committee members have reported they have no relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Planning Committee Member Disclosures
According to AMDA and ACCME policy, all those in a position to control content are required to disclose any relevant financial relationships. Program Committee members with relevant financial relationships are listed below. All other Planning Committee members have reported they have no relevant financial relationships to disclose. AMDA Staff have no relevant financial relationships to disclose.

Michele Bellantoni, MD, CMD – Sanofi: Principal Investigator; Thomas Edmondson, MD, CMD – BENHA of MD – Board Member; George Grossberg, MD – Lundbeck, Otsuka, Takecka: Consultant; Accera, Novan: Research Support; Merck, Newron: Safety Monitoring Committee; Meenakshi Patel, MD, CMD – Sanofi Avanir: Speaker; Avanir, Eisai, Forest, GSK, Janssen, Lilly, Lundbeck, Merck: Research Grant; Robert Zorowitz, MD, MBA, CMD – United Health Group: employee and stockholder.

Faculty disclosure information is provided with the individual session information for each session on the CME information page.

Target Audience:
Medical Directors, Attending Physicians, Nurses (NP, DON, RN, CNA), Administrators, Consultant Pharmacists, Therapists

Standard: $395.00

Packages Display Packages

2015 Annual - Includes CME

Sessions Included:

Developing the Skills for Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement in Long-Term Care (Mar 19, 2015 08:00 AM)

Teaching Medical and Interprofessional Learners in the Nursing Home: Insights into Curriculum Development and Effective Teaching Modalities (AMDA Foundation Sponsored Session) - CME/CMD credits not available for this session (Mar 19, 2015 08:00 AM)

Vitamins or No Vitamins (Mar 19, 2015 08:00 AM)

Transitions in Care, Transitions in Life (Mar 19, 2015 08:00 AM)

Post-Acute Medicine: Case-Based Approach to the Medical Management of Common High Acuity Clinical Conditions in the Skilled Nursing Facility (Mar 19, 2015 08:00 AM)

Adverse Events, Triggers, and Diagnostic Errors: Practical Aspects of Patient Safety and Risk Reduction for the Interdisciplinary Team - CME/CMD credits not available for this session (Mar 19, 2015 08:00 AM)

Innovation and Transformation in Assisted Living (Mar 19, 2015 08:00 AM)

A Positive & Proactive Approach to Supporting Older Adults Living with Brain Ability Changes: Enhancing Individual Practice in Dementia Care - CME/CMD credits not available for this session (Mar 19, 2015 08:00 AM)

Practical Psychopharmacology in Long-Term Care (Mar 19, 2015 01:30 PM)

Person-Centered and Data-Driven Care: How Innovation Among Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Innovation Center (CMMI) Demonstration Projects is Personalizing Care Across Several States (Mar 19, 2015 01:30 PM)

Latest Approaches to Difficult Medical Issues in Long-Term Care (Mar 19, 2015 01:30 PM)

Fundamentals of Infection Control in the Nursing Home - CME/CMD credits not available for this session (Mar 19, 2015 01:30 PM)

Palliative Care in Long-Term Care: Clinical and Ethical Considerations (Mar 19, 2015 01:30 PM)

A Positive & Proactive Approach to Changing Dementia Care and Building Dementia-Competent Communities: Changing the Culture of Care - CME/CMD credits not available for this session (Mar 19, 2015 01:30 PM)

General Session I - How Are We Going to Live with Alzheimer's Disease? - CME/CMD credits not available for this session (Mar 20, 2015 08:00 AM)

Connecting Nursing Facilities and Other Post-Acute Care Providers to Electronic Health Information Exchange (Mar 20, 2015 11:00 AM)

Academic Detailing: Using Outreach Education to Improve Long-Term Care (Mar 20, 2015 11:00 AM)

Serious Adverse Events: Pennsylvania's Approach for Reducing Events and Prohibiting Payment (Mar 20, 2015 11:00 AM)

Dementias and Associate Mood Disorders in Long-Term Care: An Interprofessional Approach (Mar 20, 2015 11:00 AM)

Determining "Medical Necessity" in an Government Review of Skilled Nursing Facility Records (Mar 20, 2015 11:00 AM)

Providing High-Quality Health Care to the Aging Adult with Developmental Disability (Mar 20, 2015 11:00 AM)

The CMD as the Head of the Medical Staff: Medical Director Oversight of Attending Physician (An ABPLM Sponsored Session) (Mar 20, 2015 11:00 AM)

Collaboration with Non-Physician Practitioners (Mar 20, 2015 11:00 AM)

Emotional Intelligence to Improve Interprofessional Collaborative Team Behaviors and Practices (Mar 20, 2015 11:00 AM)

Using Telemedicine to Reduce Potentially Avoidable Hospitalizations of Nursing Home Residents (Mar 20, 2015 01:30 PM)

Improving Quality Outcomes for Pain: Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement (QAPI) and the Interdisciplinary Team (IDT) (Mar 20, 2015 01:30 PM)

Bridging the Chasm Between Provider and Payer (Mar 20, 2015 01:30 PM)

This Year in Review for Long-Term Care (Mar 20, 2015 01:30 PM)

Updates on Common Infections in Post-Acute and Long-Term Care (PA/LTC) (Mar 20, 2015 01:30 PM)

The Avoid Ability Dilemma: A 3-D Ride to Explore Mysteries of Nursing Home to Hospital Transfers (Mar 20, 2015 01:30 PM)

Medication Therapy Management (MTM) (Mar 20, 2015 01:30 PM)

Communication Skills for Successful Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (Mar 20, 2015 01:30 PM)

Quality Improvement Awards and Expert Panel Discussion (AMDA Foundation Sponsored Session) CME/CMD credits not available for this session (Mar 20, 2015 01:30 PM)

Medical Applications for Smartphones and Tablets Used by Nursing Home Advanced Practitioners, Pharmacists, and Physicians (Mar 20, 2015 04:00 PM)

Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement (QAPI): The Interdisciplinary Team Approach to Quality (Mar 20, 2015 04:00 PM)

The Impact of Value Based Medicine on Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (Mar 20, 2015 04:00 PM)

Sleep Disturbance in Dementia: Strategies for Patient Improvement and Reduction of Caregiver Burden (Mar 20, 2015 04:00 PM)

Differential Diagnosis and Work Up of Infiltrates on Chest X-Rays (Mar 20, 2015 04:00 PM)

Marijuana Use in Long-Term Care Facilities: Learning from the Colorado Laboratory (Mar 20, 2015 04:00 PM)

Quality Prescribing Campaign: Preventing Adverse Drug Events and Collaborating with your Consultant Pharmacist (An ASCP Sponsored Session) (Mar 20, 2015 04:00 PM)

Green House Nursing Homes: Benefits, Challenges, and Issues Related to Care (Mar 20, 2015 04:00 PM)

General Session II - AMDA's Top Policy Issues 2015 CME/CMD credits not available for this session (Mar 21, 2015 08:00 AM)

General Session II - Update on Competencies for Attending Physicians in the Nursing Home - <span style='color:red;'>CME/CMD credits not available for this session</span> (Mar 21, 2015 08:00 AM)

General Session II - Impact of Physician Payment Reform on Future of Practice -CME/CMD credits not available for this session (Mar 21, 2015 08:00 AM)

The Health Care Social Media Revolution: Best Practices for Using Social Media to Improve Your Post-Acute/Long-Term Care Practice (Mar 21, 2015 11:00 AM)

Quality Improvement: A Team Effort (Are YOU on the Team?) Zeroing in on Hospitalizations and Infections (C. diff) (Mar 21, 2015 11:00 AM)

Preparing for Alternate Payment Structures: Bundled Payments in Post-Acute Care (Mar 21, 2015 11:00 AM)

Leverage Your Post-Acute Care Experience to Expand Your Career Opportunities (Mar 21, 2015 11:00 AM)

Clinical Practice Guideline in Managing Heart Failure in the Long-Term Care Setting: What We Have Learned and How We Move Forward? (Mar 21, 2015 11:00 AM)

Billing and Coding in Long-Term Care: New Codes and Recurring Perplexities - CME/CMD credits not available for this session (Mar 21, 2015 11:00 AM)

Is The Doctor In? Defining, Measuring and Enhancing Physician Engagement in Skilled Nursing Facilities (Mar 21, 2015 11:00 AM)

Making Adverse Events Work For You (Mar 21, 2015 11:00 AM)

Diagnosing and Preventing UTIs in Older Adults: Integrating Technical and Socio-adaptive Principles (An AGS Sponsored session) (Mar 21, 2015 11:00 AM)

Model Programs and Policies Swap Session (Mar 21, 2015 11:00 AM)

Parkinson Disease and Telemedicine (Mar 21, 2015 02:30 PM)

Quality Initiatives in the Care of Wounds (Mar 21, 2015 02:30 PM)

Patient-Centered Care: Collaborative Efforts of Family and Geriatric Medicine in a Patient-Centered Medical Home (Mar 21, 2015 02:30 PM)

The Shifting of Complex Respiratory Care to Post-Acute Care: Are We Prepared? (Mar 21, 2015 02:30 PM)

Avoiding Legal Liability for Prescribing Antipsychotics (Mar 21, 2015 02:30 PM)

Take a Seat for Stand-up: Transforming the Dreaded Morning Meeting (Mar 21, 2015 02:30 PM)

Why Weight? Updating the Diagnosis of Malnutrition in the Nursing Home (Mar 21, 2015 02:30 PM)

Orthopedics and Geriatrics: Challenges and Opportunities in the Changing Health Care Environment (Mar 21, 2015 04:00 PM)

Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) Physician Quality Data: Peril or Promise? (Mar 21, 2015 04:00 PM)

Nursing Homes and Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs): How to Divide the Pie (Mar 21, 2015 04:00 PM)

Dementia, Dysphagia and Avoiding Disaster: Considerations of Altered Medication Administration (Mar 21, 2015 04:00 PM)

Passing the "SNF Test:" The Role of the Medical Director and Clinician in Determining the Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) Level of Care (Mar 21, 2015 04:00 PM)

End the Silence: Workshop on the Practical Approach to Reporting Elder Abuse (Mar 21, 2015 04:00 PM)

Quenching Dry Throats: Implementing a Free-Water Protocol in a Teaching Nursing Home (Mar 21, 2015 04:00 PM)

Be the Change! Skills for Becoming a Change Agent in your Facility (Mar 21, 2015 04:00 PM)

Navigating Mood and Behavior Challenges in Long-Term Care: Strategies for Optimal Outcomes (Mar 19, 2015 08:00 AM)

General Session I (Mar 20, 2015 08:00 AM)

Choosing Wisely (Mar 20, 2015 04:00 PM)

General Session II (Mar 21, 2015 08:00 AM)

General Session II - Congressional Perspective on Future of Healthcare Reform (Mar 21, 2015 08:00 AM)

Collaboration between the Medical Director and the Administrator (An ABPLM Sponsored Session) (Mar 21, 2015 02:30 PM)

Meet the Expert Breakfast Session: Movement Disorders in the Older Adult (Mar 21, 2015 06:00 AM)

Red Eye Rounds: Medical Direction Challenges (Mar 22, 2015 06:30 AM)

Red Eye Rounds: Clinical Quandaries (Mar 22, 2015 06:30 AM)

General Session III (Mar 22, 2015 08:30 AM)

General Session III - ANNE-MARIE FILKIN LECTURE -- Adventures in Storytelling: Telling Stories to Improve Post-Acute/Long-Term Care (Mar 22, 2015 08:30 AM)

General Session III - Quality in Post-Acute/Long-Term Care: 2015 and Beyond (Mar 22, 2015 08:30 AM)

In-the-Trenches: Peer Group Roundtable Discussion (Mar 21, 2015 01:00 PM)

Poster Session Opens (Mar 19, 2015 11:30 AM)

Poster Session (Mar 20, 2015 07:30 AM)

Poster Session Closes (Mar 21, 2015 07:45 AM)

Standard: $395.00

Sessions

Developing the Skills for Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement in Long-Term Care

Mar 19, 2015 8:00am ‐ Mar 19, 2015 5:00pm

Identification: A31

Credits: None available.

Accreditation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine designates this Internet Enduring Material for a maximum of 7 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ABPLM Designation Statement: This Internet Enduring Material has been pre-approved by the American Board of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (ABPLM) for a total of 7 management hours toward certification as a Certified Medical Director (CMD) in post-acute and long-term care medicine. The CMD program is administered by the ABPLM.  Each physician should claim only those hours of credit actually spent on the activity.

Session Description:
Looking forward, a major challenge facing nursing homes is implementing Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement (QAPI) programs. The recently mandated QAPI activities significantly expands the level and scope of facility quality improvement activities, mandating adoption of advanced, systematic data-driven quality improvement methodologies to sustain and improve the quality of care and quality of life of nursing home residents (CMS, 2013). Nursing homes are now working to build the training and infrastructures needed to implement effective QAPI programs.

The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has identified five key elements for QAPI programs:
1. Design and scope
2. Governance and leadership
3. Geedback, data systems and monitoring
4. Performance improvement projects (PIPs)
5. Systematic analysis and systematic action.

This session will be structured around those elements and equip nursing home leaders with core skills for designing their own QAPI programs and developing QAPI skills in their interdisciplinary teams with an emphasis on the knowledge and skills needed to use a systematic approach to analyze, initiate, implement, and monitor evidence based performance improvement projects. Key skills include problem identification, flow diagraming, data collection and trending data, root cause analysis and monitoring. Participants will learn from brief didactic introductions to skills and small group case-studies that apply those skills.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Discuss the five key elements of effective QAPI programs.
  • Identify a strategy to design and implement a QAPI program within their nursing home that engages the interdisciplinary team in improving resident care delivery and outcomes
  • Apply fundamental quality improvement skills, including problem identification, flow diagramming, and root cause analysis to performance improvement projects
  • Describe the importance of monitoring in quality improvement and strategies to develop monitoring systems in their QAPI programs.

Speaker(s):
Dallas Nelson, MD, CMD
Jane Pederson, MD, MS
Tobie Olsan, RN, PhD
Suzanne Gillespie, MD, RD, CMD

Disclosure(s):
None

Reference(s):
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. QAPI; Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement. Accessed July 16, 2013. From http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Provider-Enrollment-and-Certification/QAPI/NHQAPI.html Institute of Medicine, Ed Health Professions Education: A bridge to quality. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 2003.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

Vitamins or No VitaminsVitamins or No Vitamins

Preview Available

Vitamins or No Vitamins

Mar 19, 2015 8:00am ‐ Mar 19, 2015 11:30am

Identification: A33

Credits: None available.

Accreditation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine designates this Internet Enduring Material for a maximum of 3.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ABPLM Designation Statement: This Internet Enduring Material has been pre-approved by the American Board of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (ABPLM) for a total of 3.5 clinical hours toward certification as a Certified Medical Director (CMD) in post-acute and long-term care medicine. The CMD program is administered by the ABPLM.  Each physician should claim only those hours of credit actually spent on the activity. 

Session Description:
This session will describe the pathophysiology of vitamins and their role in disease prevention. We will use a case-based approach to discuss vitamin deficiencies and appropriate replacement options. We will also discuss the dangers of using mega doses of vitamins and vitamin-drug interactions. We will discuss, if with adequate nutrition, it is necessary to replace vitamins, and if so which ones.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe the physiological role for vitamins
  • Discuss vitamin deficiency syndromes and how to recognize them in the clinical setting
  • Explain abuse of vitamins and the adverse effects of hypervitaminosis
  • Discuss the role of vitamin supplementation in the post-acute long-term care setting

Speaker(s):
Suzanne C. Cryst, RD, CSG, LD
T.S. Dharmarajan, MD
Meenakshi Patel, MD, MMM, CMD
Naushira Pandya, MD, CMD

Disclosure(s):
None

Reference(s):
1. Issue: BCMJ, Vol. 53, No. 7, September 2011, page(s) 370 Council on Health Promotion. 2. Bischoff-Ferrari HA, Dawson-Hughes B, Staehelin HB, et al. Fall prevention with supplemental and active forms of vitamin D: Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. BMJ 2009; 339: b3692. 3. Pedersen JI. Vitamin D requirement and setting recommendation levels & mdash; current Nordic view. Nutr Rev 2008; 66: S165-S169. 4. Pittas AG, Chung M, Trikalinos T, et al. Systematic review: Vitamin D and cardiometabolic outcomes. Ann Intern Med 2010; 152: 307-314. Ansell JE, Kumar R, Deykin D. The spectrum of vitamin K deficiency. JAMA. Jul 4 1977; 238(1): 40-2. [Medline]. Kristin M McCabe, Michael A. Adams, Rachel M. Holden. Vitamin K Status in Chronic Kidney Disease. Nutrition. November 2013; 5: 4390-4398. Krasinski SD, Russell RM, Furie BC. The prevalence of Vitamin K deficiency in chronic gastrointestinal disorders. Am J Clin Nutr. Mar 1985; 41(3): 639-43. [Medline]. [Full Text]. 3. Neurosci Lett. 2003 May 8; 341(3): 173-6 Plasma Vitamin C, cholesterol and homocysteine are associated with grey matter volume determined by MRI in non-demented old people. Whalley LJ, Staff RT, Murray AD, Duthie SJ, Collins AR, Lemmon HA, Starr JM, Deary IJ. UK. 

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

Post-Acute Medicine: Case-Based Approach to the Medical Management of Common High Acuity Clinical Conditions in the Skilled Nursing Facility

Mar 19, 2015 8:00am ‐ Mar 19, 2015 11:30am

Identification: A35

Credits: None available.

Accreditation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine designates this Internet Enduring Material for a maximum of 3.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ABPLM Designation Statement: This Internet Enduring Material has been pre-approved by the American Board of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (ABPLM) for a total of 3.5 clinical hours toward certification as a Certified Medical Director (CMD) in post-acute and long-term care medicine. The CMD program is administered by the ABPLM.  Each physician should claim only those hours of credit actually spent on the activity.

Session Description:
Medical providers for short-stay post-acute inpatients are increasingly challenged by high medical acuity, co-morbid medical conditions, and limited diagnostic resources. This workshop addresses the most common active medical conditions responsible for complications in this setting using case-based presentations. Speakers will review current clinical guidelines from specialty organizations and address how these guidelines are best applied in the skilled nursing facility setting. The format will be a case presentation by Dr. Bellantoni for each of the four clinical conditions addressed - diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, delirium, and infection, followed by a literature review including guidelines published by specialty societies (American College of Clinical Endocrinologists, American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, American Delirium Society, Infectious Diseases Society of America, Center for Disease Control). AMDA Clinical Guidelines will be reviewed, and the speaker will summarize recommendations for management followed by audience discussion of the case.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Manage diabetes mellitus across the transition from acute hospital to post-acute inpatient setting to community, minimizing hypoglycemic events
  • Effectively manage congestive heart failure using multi-disciplinary team of the skilled nursing facility including licensed nurses, nursing assistants, nutritionists, and physical rehabilitation staff
  • Prevent, diagnosis, and manage delirium in the post-acute inpatient setting
  • Manage common infections that occur in the post-acute inpatient setting

Speaker(s):
Michele F. Bellantoni, MD, CMD
Meenakshi Patel, MD, MMM, CMD
John Loome, MD, CMD
Thomas Edmondson, MD, CMD
George C. Wang, MD, PhD

Disclosure(s):
Dr. Patel - Research Grants: GlaxoSmithKline and Sanofi

Reference(s):
AMDA Clinical Practice Guidelines - Diabetes, Heart Failure, Delirium, Common Infections. Dy P1, Morin PC, Weinstock RS. Telemed J E Health. 2013 Aug; 19(8): 643-5. do: 10.1089/tmj.2012.0274. Epub 2013 Jun 12. Use of telemedicine to improve glycemic management in a skilled nursing facility: a pilot study. Migdal A, Yarandi SS, Smiley D, Umpierrez GE. Update on diabetes in the elderly and in nursing home residents. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2011; 12: 627–632. Boxer RS1, Dolansky MA, Bodnar CA, Singer ME, Albert JM, Gravenstein S. J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2013 Sep; 14(9): 710. e5 -11. doi: 10.1016/j.jamda.2013.05.023. Epub 2013 Jul 18. A randomized trial of heart failure disease management in skilled nursing facilities: design and rationale. G. Poelzla, J. Altenbergerb, R. Pacherc, et al. International Journal of Cardiology 2014; 175: 83-89; DOI: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2014.04.255 Bergmann MA1, Murphy KM, Kiely DK, Jones RN, Marcantonio ER. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Oct; 53(10):1817-25. A model for management of delirious postacute care patients. Flanagan E1, Chopra T, Mody L. Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2011 Mar; 25(1): 271-83. doi: 10.1016/j.idc.2010.11.008. Epub 2010 Dec 17. Infection prevention in alternative health care settings. N. Stone, Center for Disease Control Guidelines for Management of Multi-drug Resistant Organisms in Long-term Care. http://www.cdc.gov/longtermcare/     

Speaker(s):
  • Michele Bellantoni, MD, CMD, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University
  • Thomas Edmondson, MD, CMD, Medical Director, AbsoluteCARE
  • George Wang, MD, PhD, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University
  • Meenakshi Patel, MD, MMM, CMD, Assoc., Prof., Dept of Geriatrics, Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine
  • John Loome, MD, CMD
Standard: $24.00

Teaching Medical and Interprofessional Learners in the Nursing Home: Insights into Curriculum Development and Effective Teaching Modalities (AMDA Foundation Sponsored Session) - CME/CMD credits not available for this session

Mar 19, 2015 8:00am ‐ Mar 19, 2015 5:00pm

Identification: A32

Credits: None available.

Accreditation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine designates this Internet Enduring Material for a maximum of 7 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ABPLM Designation Statement: This Internet Enduring Material has been pre-approved by the American Board of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (ABPLM) for a total of 7 management hours toward certification as a Certified Medical Director (CMD) in post-acute and long-term care medicine. The CMD program is administered by the ABPLM.  Each physician should claim only those hours of credit actually spent on the activity. 

Session Description:
This full-day session will focus on the curricular underpinnings for post-acute and long-term care medicine. The role of simulation as an educational modality will be highlighted as will the use of components of the INTERACT program for interprofessional training. Examples of successful curricula targeted towards students, residents and geriatric fellows will be presented. In the afternoon, Dr. Schools of the Netherlands will describe training for nursing home specialists. Participants will have the opportunity to work in small groups choosing breakout sessions that will focus on the role of quality improvement as an educational modality, dealing with the challenging learner and how to develop a post-acute and long-term care curriculum for undergraduate learners.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Review different simulation activities and their relevance to LTC and demonstrate how simulation informs clinical practice
  • Identify key curricular elements applicable to postgraduate trainees in the post-acute and LTC setting
  • Describe the rationale underlying the competencies and how they may inform new quality measures
  • Describe current training curriculum for NH specialists in the Netherlands and the teaching modalities proven to be most effective for NH specialist training

Speaker(s):
Gwendolen T. Buhr, MD, MEd, CMD
Paul R. Katz, MD, CMD
Rachel B. Mason, MD
Sindy McCrystle, MSN 
Douglas Oliver, MD
Jos M.G.A. Schols, MD
Daniel Swagerty, MD, MPH, CMD
Matthew S. Wayne, MD, CMD
Heidi White MD, MEd, MHS, CMD

Disclosure(s):
None

Reference(s):
Katz PR, Karuza J, Counsel SR. Academics and the Nursing Home. Clinics in Geriatric Medicine. August 1995, 11(3): 503-516. An Advanced Course in Long Term Care for Geriatric Medicine Fellows. Heidi K. White MD, MHS, MEd, Gwendolen Buhr MD, MHS, MEd, Eleanor McConnell PhD, RN, GCNS-BC, Robert J. Sullivan Jr. MD, MPH, Jack Twersky MD, Cathleen Colon-Emeric MD, Mitchell Heflin MD, Toni M. Cutson MD, MHS; William Logan MD; Kenneth Lyles MD; Sandro O. Pinheiro PhD. JAMDA 14 (2013) 499e506. Designing a Learner-Centered Geriatrics Curriculum for Multilevel Medical Learners. Sindy W. McCrystle, MSN, Louise M. Murray, MA and Sandro O. Pinheiro, PhD. JAGS 58:142;151, 2010. 

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

Innovation and Transformation in Assisted Living

Mar 19, 2015 8:00am ‐ Mar 19, 2015 11:30am

Identification: A37

Credits: None available.

Accreditation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine designates thisInternet Enduring Material for a maximum of 3.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ABPLM Designation Statement: This Internet Enduring Material has been pre-approved by the American Board of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (ABPLM) for a total of 3.5 management hours toward certification as a Certified Medical Director (CMD) in post-acute and long-term care medicine. The CMD program is administered by the ABPLM.  Each physician should claim only those hours of credit actually spent on the activity.

Session Description:
This session will address a wide range of issues of interest to practitioners caring for residents in the assisted living setting. Two recent CMS Innovation Grant projects, including one about the use of INTERACT in AL, will be presented. Clinical issues such as billing/coding, vaccinations and antipsychotic medication reduction will be discussed. Also being addressed will be literature concerning medical care and person-centered care, as well as a panel regarding future developments in the assisted living industry.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Discuss recent assisted living innovation grants
  • Describe several clinical issues practitioners face in the assisted living setting                 (i.e. billing/documentation, vaccination practices, quality improvement projects)
  • Review current assisted living literature in person-centered care

Speaker(s):
Josh Allen, RN
Daniel Haimowitz, MD, CMD
Alan Kronhaus MD
David Kyllo
Kevin O’Neil, MD, CMD
Barbara Resnick, PhD, CRNP
Lindsay Schwartz, PhD
Richard Stefanacci, DO, CMD
Sheryl Zimmerman, PhD

Disclosure(s):
Dr. Kronhaus - Doctors Making Housecalls: Co-Founder & CEO; Dr. O'Neil - Employee: Brookdale Senior Living Services.

Reference(s):
This intensive came from volunteers from the AMDA AL committee topics/format are FLEXIBLE. Part of the sessions could come from the CEAL AL 2.0 summit and a session at CALA both being held in October (in DC and CA, respectively) I will coordinate the sessions, get the appropriate number of speakers, and make sure there is no duplicate presentation of materials, I am completely at the behest of the Program Committee. There's enough material here for 2 full Thursday Intensives. This can be tailored to one intensive or several stand-alone presentations. Or you don't have to pick any. It is all completely up to you, I am happy to help in any way possible. Topics may include: -- data from Innovation Challenge Grant on INTERACT for AL/INTERACT - AL rollout (Kevin O'Neil, LuAnne Leistner) -- NCHS data from the National Survey of Long-Term Care Providers, the AHCA Quality Initiative including resources to reduce hospital readmissions and  off-label use of antipsychotics, and AHCA collaboration with the New Jersey Hospital Association's Patient Safety Organization to collect clinical data (Dave Kyllo, Lindsay Schwartz) -- how good medical care can help older adults age in place in  AL, focusing on health promotion, optimal medication management, disease management, immunizations and optimizing function and physical activity as well as brain health (Barb Resnick) -- review of systems necessary for quality care AL and working with CRNPs and AL staff to reduce hospital readmissions. Increasing complexities of care, expectations of family and responsible parties and associated risk concerns along with current trends influencing care of AL residents will be discussed with emphasis on practical day to day strategies healthcare professionals in AL may  implement to improve resident outcomes and care operations (Josh Allen, Rita Vann, Sandi Flores) -- highlights from CEAL AL 2.0 conference - -involves: Role AL Plays in Healthcare Now and does AL Stay Relevant for the Future; what consumers can expect from providers in the coming years; what AL needs to develop to be a better health care  partner and AL - specific areas including Acute care, Chronic care, Affordability, Workforce capacity, Regulations/public policy, and Technology (Dan Haimowitz) -- Journal Year in Review for AL (Sheryl Zimmerman) -- Person-Centered Care in AL (Sheryl Zimmerman) -- AMDA Initiatives for AL (Kevin O'Neil).

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

Transitions in Care, Transitions in Life

Mar 19, 2015 8:00am ‐ Mar 19, 2015 11:30am

Identification: A34

Credits: None available.

Accreditation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine designates this Internet Enduring Material for a maximum of 3.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ABPLM Designation Statement: This Internet Enduring Material has been pre-approved by the American Board of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (ABPLM) for a total of 3.5 management hours toward certification as a Certified Medical Director (CMD) in post-acute and long-term care medicine. The CMD program is administered by the ABPLM.  Each physician should claim only those hours of credit actually spent on the activity.

Session Description:
This symposium will discuss the relationship between appropriate advance care planning and reduced unnecessary hospital readmissions. Using a clinical case study as the basis for the session, attendees will learn how to elicit end-of-life discussions to promote person-centered care, document those conversations, and then respect those decisions. Barriers to good advance care planning and how to overcome them will be discussed. Additionally, current programs which have initiated good advance care planning that resulted in decreased hospital readmissions will be described.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Establish and uphold patient goals of care as part of a person-centered approach to reduce unnecessary hospital readmissions
  • Define the elements of current programs to reduce hospital readmissions through determination of patient wishes regarding advance care planning
  • Explore the positive effect on hospital readmissions of quality end-of-life and palliative care efforts
  • Expand education for patients in empowering truly informed decisions regarding advanced care planning

Speaker(s):
Moderator: James Edward Lett, II, MD, CMD
Wayne S. Saltsman, MD, PhD, CMD
James Mittelberger, MD, MPH, CMD
Karl E. Steinberg, MD, CMD
H. Edward Davidson, PharmD, MPH
Bruce Robinson, MD, MPH, CMD
Kenneth Donovan, MD

Disclosure(s):
Dr. Mittelberger - Employee: Optum

Reference(s):
None

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

Adverse Events, Triggers, and Diagnostic Errors: Practical Aspects of Patient Safety and Risk Reduction for the Interdisciplinary Team - CME/CMD credits not available for this session

Mar 19, 2015 8:00am ‐ Mar 19, 2015 11:30am

Identification: A36

Credits: None available.

Accreditation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine designates this Internet Enduring Material for a maximum of 3.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ABPLM Designation Statement: ThisInternet Enduring Material has been pre-approved by the American Board of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (ABPLM) for a total of 3.5 management hours toward certification as a Certified Medical Director (CMD) in post-acute and long-term care medicine. The CMD program is administered by the ABPLM.  Each physician should claim only those hours of credit actually spent on the activity.

Session Description:
This session will identify key components of an effective patient safety program in long-term and post-acute care, both generally and specifically for medical directors and the interdisciplinary team. It will discuss the use of trigger tools and cover numerous examples of triggers in three key areas: medications, care related issues, and infections. Discussion of actual cases will be used to illustrate how diagnostic errors are a major contributor to risk and adverse events. Many case examples will be used to explain the connections between concepts such as risk factors, precipitating factors, adverse events and adverse consequences, risk reduction, and mitigation of adverse consequences. Participants will have the opportunity to take actual clinical situations, identify related risks and precipitating events, and develop trigger tools and simple solutions that they can implement in their facilities. Actual cases and demonstration of the use of specific tools will help illustrate how patient safety can be built in to everyday practice and processes, including existing quality assurance and performance improvement activities.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Analyze an organization and facility in depth to identify important safety issues and their causes
  • Use a core set of tools and key clinical and management principles to evaluate and address patient safety issues
  • Implement a sustainable patient safety component of a facility’s quality assurance and performance improvement program
  • Identify in detail how to identify and prevent diagnostic errors that are a major source of risk factors and adverse consequences

Speaker(s):
Steven Levenson, MD, CMD
Julie Britton, MSN, GCNS-BC, RN

Disclosure(s):
None

Reference(s):
Levenson SA. Bridge building, not rain dancing: A medical director's core management responsibilities. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2001; 2: 125-133. Levenson SA. The Maryland regulations: Rethinking physician and medical director accountability in nursing homes. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2002; 3: 79-94. Levenson SA. The impact of laws and regulations in improving physician performance and care processes in long-term care. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2004; 5: 268-277. Levenson SA, Morley JE. Evidence rocks in long-term care, but does it roll? J Am Med Dir Assoc 2007, 8: 493-501. Levenson SA. The basis for improving and reforming long-term care, Part 1: The foundation. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2009; 10: 459–465. Levenson SA. The basis for improving and reforming long-term care, Part 2: Clinical problem solving and Abstract Submission http://www.prolibraries.com/library/abstract/pages/print.php?ajax=1&w... 2 of 5 9/6/2014 12:49 PM evidence-based care. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2009; 10: 520–529. Levenson SA. The basis for improving and reforming long-term care. Part 3: Essential elements for quality care. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2009; 10: 597–606. Levenson SA. Paper geriatrics (editorial). J l Amer Geriatr Soc 2010; 58: 1184-1186. Levenson SA. Medical Direction in Long-Term Care. (1993). Durham NC: Carolina Academic Press. Levenson SA. Bridge building, not rain dancing: A medical directors core management responsibilities. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2001; 2:125-133. Levenson SA. The Maryland regulations: Rethinking physician and medical director accountability in nursing homes. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2002; 3: 79-94. Levenson SA. The impact of laws and regulations in improving physician performance and care processes in long-term care. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2004; 5: 268-277. Levenson SA, Morley J E. Evidence rocks in long-term care, but does it roll? J Am Med Dir Assoc 2007, 8: 493-501. Levenson SA. The basis for improving and reforming long-term care, Part 1: The foundation. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2009; 10: 459–465. Levenson SA. The basis for improving and reforming long-term care, Part 2: Clinical problem solving and evidence-based care. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2009; 10: 520–529. Levenson SA. The basis for improving and reforming long-term care. Part 3: Essential elements for quality care. J Am Med Dir Assoc 2009; 10: 597–606. Levenson SA. Paper geriatrics (editorial). J l Amer Geriatr Soc 2010; 58: 1184-1186.
 

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

A Positive & Proactive Approach to Supporting Older Adults Living with Brain Ability Changes: Enhancing Individual Practice in Dementia Care - CME/CMD credits not available for this session

Mar 19, 2015 8:00am ‐ Mar 19, 2015 11:30am

Identification: A38

Credits: None available.

Accreditation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine designates this Internet Enduring Material for a maximum of 3.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ABPLM Designation Statement: This Internet Enduring Material has been pre-approved by the American Board of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (ABPLM) for a total of 3.5 management hours toward certification as a Certified Medical Director (CMD) in post-acute and long-term care medicine. The CMD program is administered by the ABPLM.  Each physician should claim only those hours of credit actually spent on the activity.

Session Description:
Dementia care is challenging. The purpose of these sessions is to recognize that individuals living with dementia are seeking to meet needs, find value and meaning, and live life in the context of ever-changing abilities while living in demanding settings programmed for adults with intact capacities. Teepa Snow, a nationally recognized dementia care and education specialist, and her colleagues will demonstrate how to step away from the 'fix the person' bio-medical model which promotes medications and interventions to treat behavior problems in dementia. Session I of this full-day symposium will deconstruct and reframe the neurophysiologic basis of dementia-related behaviors as expressions that communicate unmet needs and cope with environmental demands. Detecting risk factors and addressing root causes of challenging behaviors will be emphasized. Partnered activities will promote the development of a connection and the rehearsal of skills needed to effectively communicate with persons living with dementia. Lastly, Session I will train the audience to use a person-centered strategy to classify different behavioral manifestations or personalities of dementia according to retained strengths and abilities as opposed to a less useful, disease-centered understanding of dementia that emphasizes degree of functional loss and severity of illness. By the end of this session, audience members will better appreciate and understand the perspective of the person living with dementia.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe the neurophysiologic basis for dementia-related behavior expressions
  • Demonstrate how to use the Positive Physical Approach with a person living with dementia
  • Use a person-centered approach to identify retained abilities and strengths of persons living with dementia

Speaker(s):
Rollin Wright, MD, MPH, MS
Peg Chabala  
Teepa Snow, MS, OT
Beth A. Nolan, PhD

Disclosure(s):
None

Reference(s):
1. Bayles, KA, et al. (2006) Evidence-based practice recommendations for working with individuals with dementia: Simulated Presence Therapy. Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology, 14(3): xiii-xxi. 2. Bonner, (2013) CMS presentation, accessed http://www.cms.gov/Outreach-and-Education/Outreach/NPC/Downloads/2013-01-31-Dementia-Care-presentation.pdf accessed July 15, 2013. 3. Dementia Initiative, (2013). Dementia Care: The Quality Chasm (white paper), CCAL - Advancing Person Centered Living. July 8, 2013, http://www.ccal.org/national-dementia-initiative/white-paper/ 4. O'Connell, B., Gardner, A., et al. (2007) Clinical usefulness and feasibility of using reality orientation with patients who have dementia in acute care settings. International Journal of Nursing Practice.13: 182-192. 5. Zhong, KX, et al. (2007) Quetiapine to Treat Agitation in Dementia: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study. Current Alzheimer Research. 4: 81-93. 

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

Person-Centered and Data-Driven Care: How Innovation Among Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Innovation Center (CMMI) Demonstration Projects is Personalizing Care Across Several States

Mar 19, 2015 1:30pm ‐ Mar 19, 2015 5:00pm

Identification: A40

Credits: None available.

Accreditation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine designates this Internet Enduring Material for a maximum of 3.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ABPLM Designation Statement: This Internet Enduring Material has been pre-approved by the American Board of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (ABPLM) for a total of 3.5 management hours toward certification as a Certified Medical Director (CMD) in post-acute and long-term care medicine. The CMD program is administered by the ABPLM.  Each physician should claim only those hours of credit actually spent on the activity.

Session Description:
In 2012, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Innovation Center (CMMI), in partnership with the Medicare/Medicaid Coordination Office, funded a project in seven sites to improve the quality of care for residents in nursing homes by reducing avoidable hospitalizations. The organizations involved partner with nursing homes to implement evidenced-based interventions aimed at improving care and lowering costs. Most interventions entail promoting person-centeredness. In this session, four of the seven project medical directors will present examples from their projects that demonstrate how they are using person-centered care concepts and data to drive change in their facilities. Barriers and facilitators to change will be discussed. Presenters will describe ways to identify residents at high risk for rehospitalization, ways to improve care coordination/care transitions, ways to improve advance care planning, and ways to engage physicians in quality improvement efforts.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Describe innovative person-centered, data-driven care practices implemented by demonstration projects in 4 states
  • Recognize facilitators and barriers to successful implementation of innovative person-centered ideas
  • Discuss tactics for physician and interdisciplinary staff engagement in quality improvement efforts
  • Identify ways to use data in their own facility to promote person-centered strategies

Speaker(s):
Clare I. Hays, MD, CMD
Charles A. Crecelius, MD, PhD, CMD
Arif Nazir, MD, CMD
Steven L. Phillips, MD

Disclosure(s):
None

Reference(s):
Berwick DM, Nolan TW, Whittington J. The triple aim: care, health, and cost. Health Aff 2008; 27: 759 e769. Initiative to Reduce Avoidable Hospitalizations Among Nursing Facility Residents. Available at: http://innovation.cms.gov/initiatives/rahnfr/ Accessed July 10, 2014 Ouslander, JG,  Bonner, A, Herndon, L, Shutes, J. The Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers (INTERACT) Quality Improvement Program: An Overview for Medical Directors and Primary Care Clinicians in Long Term Care. JAMDA 15 (2014) 162-170. Ouslander JG, Maslow K. Geriatrics and the triple aim: Defining preventable hospitalizations in the long term care population. J Am Geriatr Soc 2012; 60: 2313 e2318. Ouslander JG, Berenson RA. Reducing unnecessary hospitalizations of nursing home residents. N Engl J Med 2011; 365: 1165 e1167. Ouslander JG, Lamb G, Perloe M, et al. Potentially avoidable hospitalizations of nursing home residents: frequency, causes, and costs. J Am Geriatr Soc 2010; 58: 627 e635. Ouslander JG, Lamb G, Tappen R, et al. Interventions to reduce hospitalizations from nursing homes: Evaluation of the INTERACT II collaborative quality improvement project. J Am Geriatr Soc 2011; 59: 745-753 Molloy DW, Guyatt GH, Russo R, et al. Systematic implementation of an advance directive program in nursing homes: A randomized controlled trial. JAMA 2000; 283: 1437 e1444. QAPI. Available at: http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Provider-Enrollment-and-Certification/QAPI/NHQAPI.html. Accessed July 10, 2014. Walsh EG, Wiener JM, Haber S, Bragg A, Freiman M, Ouslander JG. Potentially Avoidable Hospitalizations of Dually Eligible Medicare and Medicaid Beneficiaries from Nursing Facility and Home- and Community-Based Services Waiver Programs. J Am Geriatr Soc 2012: 60: 821–829. Walsh EG, Wiener JM, Haber S, et al. Potentially avoidable hospitalizations of dually eligible Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries from nursing facility and home- and community-based services waiver programs. J Am Geriatr Soc 2012; 60: 821 e829. Walsh EG, Freiman M, Haber S, Bragg A, Ouslander J, Wiener JM. Cost Drivers for Dually Eligible Beneficiaries: Potentially Avoidable Hospitalizations from Nursing Facility, Skilled Nursing Facility, and Home and Community- Based Services Waiver Programs. Final Task 2 Report for CMS. RTI Project Number 0209853.022. April 2010.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

A Positive & Proactive Approach to Changing Dementia Care and Building Dementia-Competent Communities: Changing the Culture of Care - CME/CMD credits not available for this session

Mar 19, 2015 1:30pm ‐ Mar 19, 2015 5:00pm

Identification: A44

Credits: None available.

Accreditation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Designation Statement: AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine designates this Internet Enduring Material for a maximum of 3.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

ABPLM Designation Statement: This Internet Enduring Material has been pre-approved by the American Board of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (ABPLM) for a total of 3.5 management hours toward certification as a Certified Medical Director (CMD) in post-acute and long-term care medicine. The CMD program is administered by the ABPLM.  Each physician should claim only those hours of credit actually spent on the activity.

Session Description:
Session II builds on concepts learned and skills practiced in Session I. This session will engage members of the audience to envision moving from a community of “dementia knowledge and awareness” to a “dementia competent” community with the vast majority of staff, families, and consultants sharing new habit practices in a changed culture of support and care. In Session II, Teepa Snow and her colleagues will introduce a framework for building a dementia-competent community. They will highlight the neurophysiologic basis for habit change. The focus will be on deconstructing and reframing our traditional strategy of 'train and hope' to one of supportive coaching and guided development. It promotes advancing new, more effective skills into automatic behaviors while overriding less useful but deeply ingrained habitual behaviors. The panel will present person-centered methods for bringing staff members and family members on-board. The goal is to support “new” neuronal synaptic connections and help long-term care leadership and staff to develop system-wide training and coaching programs that focus on the retained abilities of each person in the community living with dementia and person-centeredness skills of staff and care partners in an interactive session. Audience members will practice using the Gem Level System to structure an individualized dementia care plan with meaningful activities and a sense of purpose for each person in their long-term care communities living with dementia. Lastly, the group will facilitate an interactive brainstorming session with the audience to envision implementation, accountability, and sustainability of a culture of dementia-competency in their long-term care communities.

Learning Objective(s):

  • Formulate short-term and long-term plans to bring dementia awareness and competency to their long-term care communities
  • Discuss the framework for building a dementia-competent community
  • Use the Gem Level System to structure an individualized dementia care plan

Speaker(s):
Rollin Wright, MD, MPH, MS
Peg Chabala
Teepa Snow, MS, OT 
Beth A. Nolan, PhD

Disclosure(s):
Ms. Chabala is a paid consultant for Teepa Snow
Dr. Nolan has consulted for the Positive Approach, LLC and Teepa Snow

Reference(s):
1. Bayles, KA, et al. (2006) Evidence-based practice recommendations for working with individuals with dementia: Simulated Presence Therapy. Journal of Medical Speech-Language Pathology, 14 (3): xiii-xxi. 2. Bonner, (2013) CMS presentation, accessed http://www.cms.gov/Outreach-and-Education/Outreach/NPC/Downloads/2013-01-31-Dementia-Care-presentation.pdf accessed July 15, 2013. 3. Dementia Initiative, (2013). Dementia Care: The Quality Chasm (white paper), CCAL- Advancing Person Centered Living. July 8, 2013, http://www.ccal.org/national-dementia-initiative/white-paper/ 4. Fixsen, D. L., Naoom, S. F., Blase, K. A., Friedman, R. M. & Wallace, F. (2005). Implementation Research: A Synthesis of the Literature. Tampa, FL: University of South Florida, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, The National Implementation Research Network (FMHI Publication #231). 5. Kotter, J and Rathegebar, H. Our Iceberg is Melting: Changing and Succeeding Under Any Conditions, (2005), New York: St. Martins Press. O'Connell, B., Gardner, A., et al. (2007) Clinical usefulness and feasibility of using reality orientation with patients who have dementia in acute care settings. International Journal of Nursing Practice. 13: 182-192. 6. Zhong, KX, et al. (2007) Quetiapine to Treat Agitation in Dementia: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study. Current Alzheimer Research. 4: 81-93.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00
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